Dr. Kathy L. Ruddy

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Dr. Ruddy currently  holds a joint postdoctoral position spending 80% of her time working at Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience in Dublin, and 20% in the Neural Control of Movement Lab at ETH in Zürich, Switzerland. She started her research career at Queen’s University Belfast, after graduating with a first-class honours degree in Psychology in 2010 and in the same year being named by ‘The Times’ newspaper in their list of top 100 Graduates as ‘UK graduate of the year’. She went straight from undergraduate studies into a PhD, where she used functional and structural MRI measures of brain connectivity to investigate the mechanisms that give rise to inter-limb transfer of learning; a process termed ‘Cross Education’ whereby training performed with one limb (eg. the left hand) transfers to benefit the untrained opposite limb (eg. the right hand). From this work she published five peer-reviewed articles in high impact journals such as ‘Brain Structure and Function’ and ‘Journal of Neuroscience’, and co-authored a book chapter. In January 2014 she moved to Switzerland and started as a postdoctoral researcher in the Neural Control of Movement Lab in the department of Health Sciences and Technology at ETH Zürich. There, she worked for three years on projects concerning fundamental mechanisms of sensorimotor control and inter-hemispheric communication, and also co-authored a paper regarding the role of slow brain waves during sleep, which has recently been accepted for publication in Nature Communications. It was here that she also discovered her interest in Neurofeedback and Brain-Computer Interface, as methods for understanding the importance of brain rhythms for control of movement. Much of this work is currently still in the publication process and will be available to read in the coming months.

Check out some of Dr. Ruddy’s published articles:

http://www.jneurosci.org/content/jneuro/37/10/2555.full.pdf

http://download.springer.com/static/pdf/25/art%253A10.1007%252Fs00429-016-1274-1.pdf?originUrl=http%3A%2F%2Flink.springer.com%2Farticle%2F10.1007%2Fs00429-016-1274-1&token2=exp=1489249945~acl=%2Fstatic%2Fpdf%2F25%2Fart%25253A10.1007%25252Fs00429-016-1274-1.pdf%3ForiginUrl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Flink.springer.com%252Farticle%252F10.1007%252Fs00429-016-1274-1*~hmac=832ccac7fe3c6eea8d3f98cb2fc5c6c9800f93dd1fb1363784e1f46b88821a49

https://books.google.co.uk/books?hl=en&lr=&id=g8rDCQAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PA20&dq=info:_SezKyCzuWEJ:scholar.google.com&ots=mUt5uxn9OI&sig=uJwEb2472J_adHH38HL9e7NpHD0&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

http://www.jneurosci.org/content/jneuro/32/2/646.full.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4853797/pdf/fnhum-10-00204.pdf

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0306452216303190

http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-47313-0_8